Contributors

At Erraticus we believe that art, culture, and ideas matter as much as they develop emotional intelligence and empower individuals to live well. Our contributors write to engage with people who have a growth mentality, inspiring them to thrive and nurture emotional intelligence in their communities.

Interested in writing for Erraticus? Learn about our submission process and guidelines. We publish non-fiction articles which take an abstract idea, cultural phenomenon, or new technology, and enlighten readers about the subject while delivering a germ of practical wisdom. Ideas shouldn’t merely be ‘interesting.’

Arie Kruglanski

Arie Kruglanski

Arie is a Distinguished University Professor, a recipient of numerous awards, and is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. He has served as editor of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and Social Cognition, editor of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, and associate editor of the American Psychologist. As a founding Co-PI and Co-Director of START (National Center for the Study of Terrorism and the Response to Terrorism), he also conducts research with the support of grants from the Department for Homeland Security and from the Department of Defense on the psychological processes behind radicalization, deradicalization, and terrorism.

Caitlin Grimes

Caitlin is a photographer, educator, and communication professional. She enjoys writing about rhetoric, history, and philosophy, placing particular significance on human-beings as story-telling animals. She has been published in numerous outlets, both local and national, as well as in a number of academic journals. She currently resides in Raleigh, NC with her dog Marvel.
Charles Huenemann

Charles Huenemann

Charlie is professor of philosophy at Utah State University. He is the author of several books and essays on the history of philosophy, as well as some fun stuff, such as How You Play the Game: A Philosopher Plays Minecraft (2014).
Cheryl Misak

Cheryl Misak

Cheryl is a professor of philosophy at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Cambridge Pragmatism: From Peirce and James to Ramsey and Wittgenstein (2016).

Daniel Winchester

Daniel "Winch" Winchester is a "young professional" working in the non-profit world in Washington, DC. He spends his days developing educational materials on classical liberalism and his nights listening to good music with good friends. His passions include Judaism, Dave Matthews Band, and political philosophy.
David Pimentel

David Pimentel

David, an associate professor of law (J.D., M.A., U.C. Berkeley; B.A., BYU) joined the UI College of Law in 2015. Before beginning his academic career in 2007, he worked for the United Nations, overseeing Court Management and Legal Aid at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, and directing Rule of Law activity in South Sudan for the U.N. Mission there. He has also led USAID-funded court reform projects in Romania and in Bosnia and Herzegovina, returning to Sarajevo in 2010-11 as a Fulbright Scholar. He has written on the subject of forfeiture reform, as well as on issues of child protection. He is an advocate for legal protection of parents’ rights, particularly against a state actor’s second-guessing of parenting choices, and has been cited and quoted by state appeals and supreme courts, overturning convictions in these cases.
DB Krupp

DB Krupp

DB is an assistant professor of criminology and the director of the SALT lab at Lakehead University in Ontario, as well as a fellow in evolution and governance with One Earth Future.
Dinsa Sachan

Dinsa Sachan

Dinsa is a science and culture journalist based in New Delhi. Her work has appeared in Discover, The Lancet, and Playboy, among others.
Erin Moore

Erin Moore

Erin is an administrator and instructor at the University of Utah, holding degrees in sociology and international affairs. She writes about gender, religion, art, and history, exploring how individuals exist within and fight against social systems. Her essays have been published in The Exponent and Young Mormon Feminists.
Frank T. McAndrew

Frank T. McAndrew

Frank is the Cornelia H. Dudley Professor of Psychology at Knox College and an elected Fellow of several professional organizations, including the Association for Psychological Science (APS). He is an evolutionary social psychologist whose research is guided by the simple desire to make sense of everyday life, and he is currently studying gossip, aggression, and creepiness.

Heather Cazad

Heather is the director of communications and conference planner at Character.org, an education nonprofit in DC. She has served as guest editor for the Journal of Character Education, editor for the Schools of Character Magazine, and manuscript screener in fiction and nonfiction for Autumn House Press. She writes about art, music, and film with regard to how they shape culture. She likes animals and comics and believes people have the capacity to accomplish amazing things.

Jeffrey Howard

Jeffrey is the founder and editor in chief of Erraticus, as well as an educator and former mental health professional. He writes on culture, psychology, religion, and history. He has been published by Valuewalk and the Foundation for Economic Education, and resides in Cascadia.
Jennifer Stitt

Jennifer Stitt

Jennifer is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a historian of modern American thought, culture, and politics. Her research interests range widely and include the history of philosophy, religion, and literature; print and visual cultures; rallies, riots, and revolutions; citizenship and community as well as exclusion and isolation in the American republic; and the transnational trafficking of ideas.
Jim Kozubek

Jim Kozubek

Jim is a science writer and computational biologist based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, Time and Scientific American, among others. His latest book is Modern Prometheus: Editing the Human Genome with Crispr-Cas9 (2016).
John Rapley

John Rapley

John is a political economist at the University of Cambridge, as well as a journalist and co-creator of the Caribbean Policy Research Institute in Jamaica. He is the author of Twilight of the Money Gods: Economics as a Religion and How it all Went Wrong (2017).

Joshua R. H. Parsons

Joshua is a peregrine thinker. He has worked in technology and innovation policy at a D.C.-based think tank. Beyond studying economics, urban planning, and violence, he spends time exploring avant-garde and postmodern film and literature, as well as country and jazz guitar. Currently, he resides in Denver, CO.

Kelley Altizer

Kelley works in management for Amazon and enjoys writing about film, literature, and technology, researching their effects on our daily lives. In her spare time, she loves composing and recording music with her husband, and writing creative fiction.
Kieran Setiya

Kieran Setiya

Kieran is a professor of philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His latest book is Midlife: A Philosophical Guide (2017). He lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.
Lorraine L. Besser

Lorraine L. Besser

Lorraine is associate professor of philosophy at Middlebury College in Vermont. Her latest book is Eudaimonic Ethics: The Philosophy and Psychology of Living Well (2014).
Melissa Dahl

Melissa Dahl

Melissa is editor of New York magazine's Science of Us, and the author of Cringeworthy: A Theory of Awkwardness (2018). She lives in New York.
Michael Amoruso

Michael Amoruso

Michael is a visiting assistant professor at Amherst College in Massachusetts.
Michael Meade

Michael Meade

Michael is a renowned storyteller, author, and scholar of mythology, anthropology, and psychology. He combines hypnotic storytelling, street-savvy perceptiveness, and spellbinding interpretations of ancient myths with a deep knowledge of cross-cultural rituals. Michael is the founder of Mosaic Multicultural Foundation. He is the author of The Genius Myth, Fate and Destiny: The Two Agreements of The Soul, Why the World Doesn't End, and The Water of Life: Initiation and the Tempering of the Soul.

Nicole Carloni

Nicole is a public health professional who specializes in global health and infectious disease. Her other interests are wide-ranging and include theoretical physics, history and feminism. In her spare time she enjoys traveling, hiking and discussing politics with friends.
Paul Gambill

Paul Gambill

Paul is the co-founder and CEO of Nori, a carbon removal marketplace. In 2015, he established the first community dedicated to carbon removal called Carbon Removal Seattle. He has 6 years of experience in managing mobile and web application projects for clients including Nike, Showtime, Target, and Starbucks, and has shipped well over a dozen different apps to the public. He earned his Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree from Arizona State University, and his Master of Engineering Management degree from Duke University.
Rachel Hadas

Rachel Hadas

Rachel studied classics at Harvard, poetry at Johns Hopkins, and comparative literature at Princeton. Since 1981, she has taught in the English Department of the Newark (NJ) campus of Rutgers University. She is the author of many books of poetry, prose, and translations. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry, an Ingram Merrill Foundation grant in poetry, and an award in literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. A memoir about her husband's illness, Strange Relation, was published by Paul Dry Books in 2011. Her previous book of poems, The Golden Road, was published by Northwestern University Press in the fall of 2012.
Rebecca Moore

Rebecca Moore

Rebecca is Emerita Professor of Religious Studies at San Diego State University. She has a specialization in American religions with a focus on new religious movements. She co-edited Peoples Temple and Black Religion in America (Indiana 2004) and authored Understanding Jonestown and Peoples Temple (Praeger 2009, paperback edition 2018). Her most recent book is Beyond Brainwashing: Perspectives on Cultic Violence (Cambridge University Press 2018). She is currently Reviews Editor for Nova Religio: The Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions, published by University of California Press.
Rick Hanson

Rick Hanson

Rick is a neuropsychologist and author of Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness (Harmony 2018), Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence (Random House 2013; in 4 languages), and Buddha's Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom (New Harbinger 2009; in 24 languages). Founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom, and an Affiliate of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, he's been an invited speaker at Oxford, Stanford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide.
Rosalyn R. LaPier

Rosalyn R. LaPier

Rosalyn is an award-winning Indigenous writer and ethnobotanist with a BA in physics and Ph.D. in environmental history. She studies the intersection of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) learned from elders and the academic study of environmental history and religion. Rosalyn is an enrolled member of the Blackfeet Tribe in Montana and Métis.
Sabine Hossenfelder

Sabine Hossenfelder

Sabine is a research fellow at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, with a special interest in the phenomenology of quantum gravity. Her writing has appeared in Forbes, Scientific American, and New Scientist, among others. Her latest book is Lost in Math: How Beauty Leads Physics Astray (2018).
Simon Gottschalk

Simon Gottschalk

Simon joined the University of Nevada sociology department in 1992 after earning a Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara, an M.A. from the University of Houston, and a B.A. from the University of Haifa (Israel). Combining critical symbolic interaction theory and qualitative research methods, his interests revolve around understanding the society-psyche link in phenomena as varied as youth cultures, the mass media, mental disorders, terrorism, and interactions in virtual, urban, and natural spaces.

Sloane Shearman

Sloane lives in Arlington, Virginia, where she manages academic marketing at the intersection of philosophy, politics, and economics. Prior to moving to the Washington, D.C. area she studied biological anthropology at Penn State and served as a counselor on a crisis and basic needs hotline. Her interests include starting a renaissance and taking long walks by herself.
Stephen T. Asma

Stephen T. Asma

Stephen is professor of philosophy at Columbia College Chicago. He is the author of 10 books, including The Evolution of Imagination (2017) and his latest, Why We Need Religion (2018).
Susan Feez

Susan Feez

Susan is a member of the English, Literacies, and Languages Education (ELLE) team in the School of Education at UNE. Within this group, she specializes in English language and literacy education, and educational linguistics. She is a member of the Centre for Research in English and Multiliteracies Education (CREME). Susan also has expertise in the field of Montessori education.
Tao Bak

Tao Bak

Tao is a lecturer, in the Department of Academic Support and Development at Victoria University. He is currently completing a Ph.D. focusing on the history and experience of Steiner Education as an alternative educational tradition in Australia. His research interests include the history and philosophy of alternative traditions, and language, literacy and academic development for diverse student cohorts. In addition to a Masters in Applied Linguistics from USQ, Tao completed a Master of Arts thesis examining the history of alternative medicine in colonial Australia at the University of Melbourne.
Ted Nordhaus

Ted Nordhaus

Ted is an author, environmental policy expert, and the co-founder and executive director of the Breakthrough Institute in California. He is a co-author of An Eco-Modernist Manifesto (2015). He lives in Oakland.